The Harvest has always been a tradition of significance and long standing in countryside communities, and Cumbria has never missed a chance to embrace the event and recognise the importance it carries with it.

The harvest festival, which dates back to pagan times, has been brought into the modern era with gatherings in churches and schools.

The Mail: SMILES: Charlotte North, Lucas Messenger-Jones and Charli Smith with headteacher Mr Lewis at Ireleth St Peter’s in 2010 SMILES: Charlotte North, Lucas Messenger-Jones and Charli Smith with headteacher Mr Lewis at Ireleth St Peter’s in 2010

It is traditional to bring food to schools and churches, to be distributed to the needy, pray and sing hymns, and, in schools to use the occasion to learn about the harvest process and farming, and about fruit and vegetables.

Many schools and businesses over the years have showed off their impressive collection of products they have collected to give to the needy for Harvest Festival.

The festival gives thanks for the collection, the work and all the food that has been brought in and stored for the winter months ahead.

As such a long-standing tradition, it has been a key component in the growth and development of the community, as well as integration between schools and businesses with the local faith community.

The Mail: POSE: Fundraiser Alan Docker from Sprint Mount Church, Barrow with pupils from Greengate Infant School, Gracie Warriner, Bailey Gaitskel, McKenzie Fisher and Ruby LydonPOSE: Fundraiser Alan Docker from Sprint Mount Church, Barrow with pupils from Greengate Infant School, Gracie Warriner, Bailey Gaitskel, McKenzie Fisher and Ruby Lydon

In 1922, Barrow’s Harvest Festival saw an incredibly generous amount of food collected for the harvest by local residents.

The harvest was gathered at the Sailors Rest.

The pile was so large that it could be made into a magnificent display to proudly show the generosity of the local town’s folk.

Since that decade, the Dalton Salvation Army had been an active player in the harvest and put together large quantities of food for displays in the town hall.

The Mail: GIVING: Barrow Age Concern chief officer Adrienne Poole (left) is pictured with Asda Store deputy Christine GraftGIVING: Barrow Age Concern chief officer Adrienne Poole (left) is pictured with Asda Store deputy Christine Graft

2010 saw a healthy donation which came courtesy of the work by the pupils of Ireleth St Peter’s School, under the guidance of headmaster Mr Lewis.

Items donated included baked beans, tomato soap, bread, oranges, fruits, and vegetables. Some of the school’s little helpers included Charlotte North, Lucas Messenger-Jones, and Charlie Smith.

With years of events, Cumbria has never failed to display its people's kindness.