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Thursday, 23 October 2014

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Police issue warning following spate of Barrow burglaries

POLICE in Barrow are urging householders to keep doors and windows locked following spate of burglaries.

There have been a number of recent burglaries at homes in the Hawcoat area.

Properties have been entered by insecure doors and windows and thieves have stolen items including handbags, jewellery, cash, mobile phones, electronics and keys.

Most have happened during the evening or overnight at houses where doors or gates have been left unlocked or windows open.

In one case, the occupants were at home but were unaware of the burglary until later.

Police said it appears some offenders are wandering the streets looking for insecure doors and windows.

Nationally, more than 40 per cent of domestic burglaries are committed by opportunist thieves taking advantage of open or unlocked doors and windows.

Community Police Officer for Hawcoat, Jenna Birbeck, said: “Crime levels have fallen in Barrow and the burglary of properties remains a relatively rare crime, but there are still some thieves out there looking for easy opportunities.

“The good news is that by taking a few basic precautions, homeowners can reduce the chances of becoming a victim.”

Police issued the following crime prevention tips:

 - Whenever possible, keep your doors locked and windows closed, especially if you are upstairs, or in another part of the house, or in the garden.

Also, we encourage people to fit, and most importantly use, good locks on ground floor and accessible
windows.

 - Remember to lock up even if you are only going out for a couple of minutes - that is all the time a thief needs.

 - Before going to bed, close all ground floor and accessible windows and remember to lock all of your doors.

 - It is worth remembering that most household insurance policies do not cover the theft of property from within a home that has been left insecure.

 - 'Postcode' all types of property to deter thieves and improve the chances of tracing the stolen items.

‘Postcoding’ can be done with ultra-violet marker pens, engraving, stamping or even paint. Property can also be made identifiable by other unique systems, such as ‘Smartwater’.

Further details are available at www.smartwater.com or from your local Neighbourhood Police Team.

 - If you have an intruder alarm – use it. Set it at night to protect the downstairs.

PC Jenna Birbeck added: “Please let us know as soon as possible if you see anyone behaving suspiciously.

"Many criminals are apprehended due to information from members of the public.”

 

 

Have your say

Where to start?
Through successive governments the 'thin blue line' has become thinner and thinner. Please do not think for one moment I am making light of the subject of increasing crime levels: yes, it is. Through massaging of statistics and prioritising, or as often is the case, not prioritising, crimes, we are lead to beleive that crime is on the decrease.
Our, yes our, officers numbers are already stretched to nearly breaking point. Why should this be: lack of appropriate and sufficient funding of the police; police being used as substitute welfare professionals because the 'welfare professionals' are having their budgets cut like all other areas with some of their responsibilities being shifted to police officers; not enough officers in place to adequeately deal with increasing crime levels because the 'powers that be' have this detached from reality idea that by decreasing levels of police officers their budgets can be balanced whilst they (the heirachy) pat each other on the back thinking what a good job they are doing.
Please reattach yourselves to reality you movers and shakers in the upper echelons of the constabulary.
How could this insight into what policing is all about in this day and age, as opposed to the days when the heirachy were 'on the beat', be achieved? Quite simply by senior officers, for example, spending Saturday night shift on the beat in Barrow so they can experience first hand just what officers have to deal with. Why not try spending the weekend nightshift with the custody sargeant and gain current, first hand experience of today in the real world? Take time out to go on some of the estates where deprivation is rife with the commensurate levels of crime. None of these, and a good many other aspects of todays policing 'on the fron line', are pleasant. However, if your view (inspectors and above) of the world today is from your office window, if you are surrounded by flow-charts, pie-charts, spread-sheets, etc, which through translation will tell you that crime levels are down, then you are in the wrong job.
Let us move away from this 'softly softly' approach and get back to real policing. Let the welfare professionals do their job and the police do theirs.
The most successful managers, no matter in what discipline they are engaged within, realise their most important and vital asset to operating in a positive and successful manner is that they manage their personal in a non-authoritarian manner, that they listen to feedback, and take action accordingly, so that their personel can fulfil their obligations in a willing manner with the kock-on effect that morale is maintained through actively working as a team, at all levels.
I empathise fully with front-line officers of today. Not only have you to deal with the belligerants on the streets, you also have a non-listening, non-engaging line-management system that is having a negative effect in many aspects of your work, especially within the area of morale.

Posted by Observer on 20 November 2012 at 20:15

Just because you don't see police officers in your area does not mean they haven't been there. I spent several hours last week patrolling around the Dane Avenue area. Of course it was very late so the local residents were asleep!

Posted by R Peel on 20 November 2012 at 16:39

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